North america (Sioux) The birth of the Sioux people
Posted by     janv. 18, 2019     Home , Les contes et légendes de Lunesia , Myths and Legends of the Americas    0 Comments
North america (Sioux) The birth of the Sioux people

Creative inspiration:

I don't know about you, but I love feathers! When I find one on a walk, my heart is filled with gratitude and a smile is always born on my lips. I know that for many people, a feather is nothing more than... a feather. But for me, they symbolize lightness, a dance among the clouds, but also the sound of drums and ancient rituals. I always assimilate the feather to shamanism and ancient traditions.

Plume peinte sur ardoiseMoreover, the use of feathers is found in many traditions: for some wiccans, they represent a connection with the divine. In Amerindians, feathers are used for purification and healing.

In addition, Indian peoples (whether from North America, the Amazon or elsewhere) all use feathers in their rites. Whether it is to decorate their headdresses, their shamanic drums or even dream catchers, they use feathers for protection and to reflect negative energies.

It goes without saying that, for someone like me who rejoices when she finds a feather, I could only integrate it into my creations. When I work on a dream catcher or Medicine Wheel, I look for the right feathers first and foremost. Whether natural or coloured, they are all carefully chosen because they will not just decorate an object, but rather make it vibrate, awaken it and then extend their vibrations to you. It is in this perspective and belief that I choose these feathers.

This brings me to the story I'm about to tell you. You may have already noticed that Sioux tribes frequently use feathers, but above all, they have a clear preference for eagle feathers. Do you know why? I invite you to discover it below

The tale:

That was in the old days. Unktehi, the monster who lives in the water, caused a huge flood by fighting against men.

Wanka Tanka, the Great Spirit, let it happen. We don't know why.

Everything was then submerged, except for a hill. So the men took refuge there. But it didn't last long, the waters rose again until they covered the hill. The rocks and peaks spilled over onto the men. All perished and their blood coagulated into a large pool. That is why these places are the tomb of the ancestors of this community. And that is why these quarries contain our sacred stone, the stone made from the blood of our ancestors, the one we use to make our sacred pipes.

Aigle à tête blancheDuring the disaster, Unktehi was turned to stone. Perhaps it is the punishment of the Grandfather Spirit for causing this disaster. Unktehi's bones are in the Badlands. Its back forms a long crest and its vertebrae can be seen on a row of red and yellow rocks.

So, all died except one young girl who was very beautiful. She was saved by the great eagle Wanblee Galeshka. Just as the waters were about to cover her, he had flown to her so that she would cling to her legs.

He dropped her off at his lair, on the top of a tall tree on the highest peak in the Black Hills. It was the only place spared by the flood. Today this place is sacred.

The girl stayed with the eagle Wanblee who made her his wife. It must be said that at that time, these things were possible because people and animals were much closer than they are today.

The girl gave her eagle husband twins, a boy and a girl, who were born on top of this mountain. Again there were men on earth.

When the waters receded, Wanblee took his little family down to the earth and asked them to form a powerful nation, the Oyate Lakota.

The children grew up, who in turn made children and so on. A nation was born, descended from the eagle. That's why the Sioux wear an eagle feather.

Text based on a legend told by Lame Deer, a Santee grandmother (Winner, South Dakota)

Conclusion :

As you can see, I draw my inspiration from myths and legends around the world. It is always a real pleasure for me to tell you what lies behind the creations I offer you, what magic I want to offer you.

In fact, I invite you to tell me, following this article, if you liked this legend. Did you know her? Have you heard any variations of this one? I would be happy to read your shares

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